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-fire. netanyahu said israel is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend itself. and egypt, which is brokering a deal between the two sides, cancelled a press conference where officials were expected to announce a deal with terms for a cease-fire. tomorrow, secretary clinton meets with the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a buildi
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
're getting these rockets through the tunnels in the southern border with egypt. some of them is more than one stage. it's a long rocket. it has to be disassembled and brought in. and this has increased the range of the rockets fired by hamas and the other resistance organizations as far as jerusalem and tel aviv. and that has real significant change. really the most significant change we've seen in the conflict between hamas and israel for quite some time. >> reporter: you and i were also on the scene about four or five blocks from here earlier in the day when three israeli missiles hit the second floor of the media center. explain what happened there earlier. >> reporter: that was about 3:20 in the afternoon, and we saw three rockets hit the building. one hit the front. we saw a great big ball of flame coming out. very quickly, a large crowd of journalists, of course, and first responders, the fire department, the ambulances showed up. they did bring out a man on a stretcher. his body was completely charred. he appeared lifeless. >> reporter: his clothes had been burned off. >> reporter: com
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
to a cease-fire. a deal was announced in cairo by secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister. israel agreed to stop air strikes in gaza, where at least 161 palestinians have been killed since last wednesday. hamas promised to stop firing rockets which have killed five israelis. there were fears the deal might not happen after a bomb went off on a bus in tel aviv this morning. 27 people were hurt, no one has claimed responsibility. we have reports from gaza and israel tonight. we begin with clarissa ward in cairo, where that cease-fire was brokered. >> reporter: after 24 hours of intense shuttle diplomacy, secretary clinton walked away with what she came for: a cease- fire agreement between israel and hamas that she called the first step in a long process. >> the people of this region deserve the chance to live free today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
by the united states and instead they find egypt, turkey, other countries of the region, are playing a much more proactive role in the crisis. >> hillary clinton will be meeting with mahmoud abbas, with the palestinian authority, with fatah in the west bank. a lot of observers say that's a face-saving move to help him out. sort of been sidelined in all of this, who comes out in the group stronger? does hamas emerge stronger no matter what happens? what does that mean moving forward for u.s. relations with pat stillian groups? the u.s. doesn't recognize hamas. been trying to deal with the palestinian authority. but if they have lost power, what does that mean moving forward to getting a longer term peace deal? >> to be honest, i don't think either palestinian faction comes out ahead the palestinian people have known six decades of futility. never been able to formulate what they need to do with their own lives. never have diplomatic answers. so i think now the hamas people will have their moment in the sun. there will be people that will come to them. visitors from afar. the turks will come in, a
of israel and hamas are in egypt separately for peace talks. hamas issuing its demand for a cease-fire. they want israel to end a long-running military blockade of gaza immediately. the carnage from the last 24 hours, arwa damon is in gaza city. >> reporter: the large slab of concrete and mangled metal finally gives way. buried beneath it, another lifeless body. it's the second child we've seen. there was also a baby. others in the neighborhood say the blast killed all ten people who lived here. israel says it was targeting a man who heads a rocket launch unit. people we spoke with said they never heard of him. this was a family home. >> people here are telling us that so far those who have been killed in this strike have been women and children. and they have not been able to find any survivors. just moments ago, from that back corner, they did pull out the body of a tiny child. an over here there's another frantic effort under way. tempers easily flare as frustration and anger mount. >> she's my uncle's wife, this young man shouts. rage coupled with sorrow etched across his face
as rockets continue to fill the air over israel and gaza and a planned cease fire, visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister may not be holding up. senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in the middle of it all. she has more for you from gaza city. >> reporter: what is happening on both sides of the gaza/israel border looks and feels like war to anyone who has to live with it, no matter what the governments on either side have declared. this is a small taste of what it fe felt like in gauza over a 24-hor period. >> that is exactly -- all right. i'm going to move out of the way and let you get a look here. i'm going to let you get a lock at what is going on. i can see the black smoke. it's difficult to capture on camera. you saw that flash. this is what we have been dealing with all day. we've also been dealing with -- i'm sorry, the power has just gone out. we have been dealing with power outages, wolf. this feels like war. it may not have been declared, but it feels like war to the civilians who live here. >> the booms and smoke from targeted air strikes from morning till night
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
of the war in gaza, when the visiting prime minister of egypt and the hamas prime minister touched the dead child. >> translator: i was here and i saw the child who was martyred. >> translator: the blood is on both of our hands. ours and the egyptian hands. >> reporter: we watched more children being brought into the hospital. the doctors say several have died, including a child burned to death. >> as a doctor, and as a human, i can't do anything for him because i know he has died now, you know? and you can't imagine if it's your baby, how do you feel? why? these raids, why? >> reporter: the influx of casualties, men, women, and children is overwhelming this hospital. underlying how this war is not just between soldiers. civilians on both sides of the border are enduring the grinding pain of loss. and what you're hearing behind me are the sounds of evening prayer beginning here in gaza city. throughout these prayers, oftentimes we're hearing again, the sounds of booms and we're seeing the lights of rockets headed toward israel. a lot of people are talk about whether or not war has been decl
. the president of the united states is deeply sloughed with this. he's speaking with the leaders of egypt. he's hoping that the government of qatar, of turkey, all of whom have good relations with hamas in gaza, that they can convince hamas to stop the launching of these rockets and missiles into israel. if they stop the israelis will stop their strikes against them and then they can begin, hopefully down the road, to achieve some long range solution that's going to be very, very difficult, as all of us know. but the prime minister of israel, benjamin netanyahu, convened his cabinet here in jerusalem today. he made it clear in a public statement that if the rockets keep coming in, the israelis have already stood on standby 75,000 ground forces, reservists, 30,000 of them already have been activated during training exercises not far from gaza. and they'll go in, as brutal and as ugly and as horrendous as that might be. they might go in. they don't want to do that because it will cause an enormous amount of pain all around and the israelis have had a relatively poor experience in gaza four year
electedded muslim brotherhood leader of egypt is facing the same kind of revolt some would say in the streets. we'll keep a close eye on live developments in cairo. our thanks to steve harrigan, just several feet above that scene right now. bill: that is breaking and developing overseas. also back at home we're only minutes away from susan rice and her arrival on the hill. show you a live look where we expect the ambassador to arrive. she will sit down with her harshest critics who say she misled the american people on the attack in libya. we'll get reaction from the man who used to hold her job, former u.n. ambassador to the u.n., john bolton, is our guest next martha: all right. we've got a fox news alert because it is 9:30 on the east coast and there is senator kelly ayotte as she walks into a very important meeting this morning after a couple of months of controversy over this u.s. ambassador susan rice is about to face her toughest republican critics on benghazi. this is a live shot on the interiors and escalators of capitol hill this morning. ambassador rice will sit down with senators
they sat down at the negotiating table. of course, with egypt as a immediatier, with the israelis. this time around, they were able to have at least some of their demands be met. first and foremost among those was that the border crossings order, that there is an easing of movement, of people, of goods. and then of course for both sides, it was stopping the violence. the israelis wanted to see an end to the rockets being launched at their population. the palestinians, hamas, wanted to see an end to israel's targeted assassinations to what they call israeli aggression against them. so for many here, this time around versus four years ago, they were able to actually, with an intermediary, again, negotiate a cease-fire. in the sense that they were able to force the israeli side to agree to some of their terms. but we'll have to see if those critical details are, in fact, implemented. will the border crossings really open? will the sea ports really be open? will people be able to have that freedom of movement that they are looking for? this is still, very much, as you say, a first ste
is the role of egypt with its leadership. a relationship that is much closer now to hamas. is that something that the white house should be concerned about? i mean, that really does seem like really a wild card in all of this. >> suzanne, i don't think it's a wild card. you are spot on. they do need to be concerned about it. more importantly, they need to do something about it to insure that israel is able to prosecute what it needs against hamas and that egypt and the muslim brotherhood stay out of any type of direct engagement or support to what is taking place in gaza right now. that would truly inflame and kind of put into greater can i ones what's taking place in the middle east, so israel needs to breathe -- apologies. egypt needs to breathe through their nose and just stay where they are. hamas and israel are going to have to work this out, and they don't need to have other folks meddling other than to try to get them to calm down, you know, settle the situation a little bit. >> to the other story that we're following. obviously, the scandal involving the former cia director general d
to being brought in to be used against them. >> glor: charlie d'agata in gaza city, thank you. egypt's president who helped broker the cease-fire amended his country's constitution today to give himself more power. mohamed morsi decreed that all his decisions are final and not subject to appeal or review. he also ordered the retrial of former president hosni mubarak for the killing of protesters during the revolution. some egyptians protested morsi's action today, accusing him and the muslim brotherhood of seizing too much power. president obama spent the holiday at the white house. he phoned 10 american service men and women in afghanistan to thank them for their sacrifice. at a u.s. base in kabul, troops feasted on 200 turkeys and the trimmings. about 66,000 americans are still deployed in afghanistan. most are expected home by the end of 2014. as we reported here last night, america's ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, has broken her silence about the controversial remarks she made back in september about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. ambassador c
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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